2018 Eventing Officials’ Scholarship Now Open for Applications

The USEA has established an educational scholarship in memory of the late Roger Haller. Designed to provide financial assistance to a licensed official who is working towards promotion to the “R” license, the “S” license or the FEI licenses. The Roger Haller Scholarship may be used to offset the costs involved in attending the necessary seminars and obtaining the practical experience required to attain promotion to the next level of licensing. The USEA will award a scholarship of $5,000 to a qualified individual in 2018. The sport is in urgent need of well trained and committed officials who can serve at the highest international levels of the sport, a need that Roger was aware of and one that concerned him greatly. Increasing the pool of eventing officials was one of the reasons he devoted so much of his time to addressing the shortfall by developing the USEA’s educational programs for officials. We sincerely hope that this annual scholarship bearing Roger Haller’s name will help increase the number of eventing judges and technical delegates qualified to officiate internationally and so ensure the health of the sport for the future.

All those who meet the eligibility requirements listed below are invited to complete the scholarship application.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE USEA Eventing Officials Scholarship
1. Applicants must be current members in good standing with the USEA & USEF.
2. Applicants must be current USEF Licensed Officials and at a minimum hold the “r” Status as an Eventing Judge or Technical Delegate.
3. Applicants should demonstrate their commitment and plans to upgrade their license to USEF “R”, USEF “S” or FEI 1/2*, FEI 3/4*

The deadline for applications is November 12th and the successful applicant will be awarded the scholarship at the USEA Annual Meeting and Convention in December in New Orleans, Louisiana. Click here to apply.

Essex Horse Trials and Seema Sonnad Junior Young Rider's Grants

The USEA Foundation is now accepting applications for the Essex Horse Trials Grant and the Seema Sonnad Junior Rider's Grant. Apply now by completing the online applications here: https://useafoundation.org/grants/. Scroll to the grant you want to apply for and click on the live "click here to apply" link. Don't forget to upload videos of your competitions--all three phases please! The deadline is October 15. Good luck to everyone!

Recipients of the 2018 Rebecca Broussard Developing Rider Travel Grants Announced

Authored By: Leslie Mintz - USEA Staff

Alexis Helffrich and London Town competing at the 2017 Rebecca Farm CIC3*. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

Alexis Helffrich and London Town competing at the 2017 Rebecca Farm CIC3*. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

Each year three types of Rebecca Broussard International Developing Rider Grants are awarded: Travel Grants, the National Developing Rider Grant ($10,0000), and the International Developing Rider Grant ($50,000). The Travel Grants are awarded to multiple riders who display the potential qualities of an international rider. These grants are used to offset some of the travel expenses to compete at The Event at Rebecca Farm CCI3* and/or CIC3* held from July 18-22 in Kalispell, Montana.

With The Event at Rebecca Farm just a few short weeks away, the USEA Foundation’s Rebecca Broussard International Developing Riders Committee has been hard at work assessing applications from riders from all over the United States who are eligible to receive the 2018 Rebecca Broussard Developing Riders Travel Grants.

The Committee has selected the following riders to receive 2018 Rebecca Broussard Developing Rider Travel Grants:

Andrea Baxter
Maya Black
Kristen Bond
Helen Bouscaren
Ellen Doughty-Hume
Matthew Flynn
Ashley Hays
Alexis Helffrich
Alexandra Knowles
Emilee Libby
Jordan Linstedt
Caroline Martin
Jennifer McFall
Bobby Meyerhoff
Hillary Moses
Katherine Rivera
Frankie Thieriot Stutes
Chris Talley

Prior to the start of the event, recipients of the Travel Grants will participate in interviews that will further assist the committee when making the final decision in November on which riders will receive the International Developing Rider Grant and the National Developing Rider Grant. The two year-end grants will be presented at the USEA Annual Meeting and Convention on December 5-9, 2018 in New Orleans.

All those listed (and any level FEI competitor at The Event at Rebecca Farm) are invited to take part in the interview process at the event.

The grants are made available by Jerome Broussard and his family in memory of his wife Rebecca, whose greatest wish was to help riders attain their dream of competing on a U.S. Eventing Team at the Olympic, World, and Pan American Games.

Congratulations to all the riders who have worked so hard to prepare for the competition at The Event at Rebecca Farm. Travel safely!

Villains and Victories Throughout My Fairytale

Ari (P.S. Arianna) and Madeline at Belton

Ari (P.S. Arianna) and Madeline at Belton

Part Three of Madeline's English Eventing Experiences.

There is no such thing as a fairytale in the horse world. Many journeys to the top levels have their magical moments, but reality will quickly kick in. My story with my heart horse, PS Arianna, is pretty darn close to a fantasy though. Even if it may seem all unicorns and rainbows, I can assure you there have been many evils and villains along the way. I’m facing the toughest one now, and I’m learning to grow a thicker skin and ride the waves as they come in.

Ari, Madeline's best friend and groom Grace Simpson, and Madeline

Ari, Madeline's best friend and groom Grace Simpson, and Madeline

I’ve been in the UK, based with Austin O’Connor at Attington Stud since March. Last year, I wouldn’t have ever dreamed I’d be able to be in England, let alone with not one, but two horses. This amazing feat is a massive thanks to the Wilton Fair Grant and the Rebecca Broussard National Developing Rider Grant. In four months, I’ve already learned so much, and that is not by any means because everything has gone smoothly. I’ve made friends and connections that I will never forget, made many mistakes, and have had many days of laughter and success, as well as days of homesickness and stress (shoutout to my wonderful family for their endless support through my many panicked phone calls). 

In my mind, I had pictured nothing less than an amazing season. Completing another one, possibly two 4* events with Ari, and bringing along my second horse, PS On Top of the World (Vinnie) to the Intermediate/2* level. The start of the season was super. I completed two advanced horse trials on Ari in the crazy England spring mud as my preparation for Badminton. I learned the British entry system and what Eventing is like over here. 

Before I knew it, it was Badminton week. The saying goes it takes a village, and it really does on the good days. On the not so good days, it takes even more. And I’m grateful for everyone’s support through a disappointing weekend, and my best friend and groom, Grace Simpson, for coming out to be there for Ari and me. It was still a magical experience, but having a fall at fence 10 jerked me back to reality. Luckily it was only a small tumble, and we were both fine. Plan B quickly came into effect. Since Ari had only run to fence ten before I messed it up, I gave her a week off and then geared up for the CCI 3* at Bramham International.

P.S. Arianna soars over Fence 8 in front of Badminton House.

P.S. Arianna soars over Fence 8 in front of Badminton House.

In the two weeks leading up to it, everything seemed to go awry. To start, Vinnie was rushed in for colic surgery. I had just entered him in his first UK event after he was cleared from a minor injury he had last fall. He was really improving in the program here and felt great, so it was really scary and gutting to watch him go through a complicated colic. To top off my week, Ari began not to feel herself. I chose to withdraw from Bramham, and not risk anything. I still went and helped Austin with his three* horses and cheered on the American riders. It’s a beautiful venue and an amazing competition, but it’s never fun going to an event you were supposed to be competing in. With both my horses out, I found myself questioning everything. Ari is 17 this year, and it’s my responsibility to listen to her and not push her past her love of the sport just for my sake after all she has given me. And Vinnie is making a good, but slow comeback. In these times it’s difficult to stay positive about things, and easy to imagine the worst-case scenarios. And being so far away from home doesn’t make it easier, even with all the wonderful people here who have been so kind and helped me through this situation. I am so grateful to the O’Connors, my British family, and everyone here who graciously got me back and forth from the vet clinic to visit Vinnie, and let me borrow a lorry to transport him—I now know I can successfully drive over here! For now, I’ll be taking a step back to regroup, and will be competing other horses here and still making the most of this trip - the learning never stops, and I’m not about to let this set back define this amazing adventure. 

Austin O'Connor and Lucky Contender wait their turn at the trot-up.

Austin O'Connor and Lucky Contender wait their turn at the trot-up.

I’m not writing this to make people sad for what’s happened, because I know I am still extremely lucky to be living this life, rather I think it’s important to put out there all the challenges we face as horse people. Social media is filled with superficial perfection (which I am a culprit of as well). It is nice to see, but you also rarely see the behind the scene struggles, and the trials and tribulations it takes to get to those flawless days. So post all your success stories and show off the perfect pictures so you can remember them, but on the bad days, don’t forget that everyone has been there too. It’s a tough sport and we all need to cheer each other on, and be grateful we can share our lives with our incredible horses. The bad days only make the good days that much better. And we are SO lucky to be doing what we love, even if on some days that love makes you feel a little manic. After all, we don’t continue this sport day after day just because. It’s a fiery passion that drives us to team up with our equine partners and be ruthless in chasing our dreams together. Whenever I feel myself wavering from that, I think back to when I was five years old and fantasizing about being among the top riders in the world as I played my equestrian computer games or rode on my stick horse, imagining I was riding around Kentucky, Badminton, and Burghley. Well, here I am, and I plan to do my best to keep calm and kick on.  

USEA Online Auction to Support Eventing Safety is LIVE!

XC GM.JPG

The USEA Online Auction is live and accepting your bids. New items will be added this week so keep checking in. Right now you can treat the loved one in your life to a fantastic weekend at the Great Meadow International. Item includes two VIP tickets plus two nights in the Bridal Suite at the historic Red Fox Inn and Tavern in Middleburg. Enjoy yourself while supporting Eventing safety through the Frangible Fence Research Program. Thank you and again, keep checking back later this week for another amazing item. Place your bid HERE.

GREAT MEADOW SUPPORTS USEA ONLINE AUCTION TO BENEFIT EVENTING SAFETY AND EDUCATION

The VIP Tent at Great Meadow International (Photo - Great Meadow archive)

The VIP Tent at Great Meadow International (Photo - Great Meadow archive)

The organizers of the Great Meadow International have generously offered to support the upcoming USEA Online Auction by donating two VIP tickets and two nights at the Red Fox Inn and Tavern in Middleburg, Virginia for the weekend of July 6-8. For the third year in a row,  Great Meadow will be the only U.S. competition to be included in the FEI’s Nations Cup™ Eventing Series and is one not to be missed.

The Bridal Suite at the Red Fox Inn and Tavern. (Photo courtesy of the Red Fox Inn and Tavern.)

The Bridal Suite at the Red Fox Inn and Tavern. (Photo courtesy of the Red Fox Inn and Tavern.)

Not only will you enjoy top-class competition you will be staying in the Bridal Suite of the historic Red Fox Inn and Tavern. Built in 1728 in the charming town of Middleburg, the Red Fox Inn embodies four-centuries of history and tradition in the heart of Virginia Hunt Country.

Photo courtesy of Great Meadow International

Photo courtesy of Great Meadow International

This year, the excitement will run high as America’s best horse and riders will be vying for top honors. The next time you see them will be at the World Equestrian Games to be held in September this year in Tryon, North Carolina.

Your VIP Blue Ribbon Tickets will include entry to the exclusive VIP tent with one VIP Weekend Car Pass. You and your guest will enjoy an entire weekend of gourmet hospitality with an open bar. Friday evening will offer heavy hors-d'oeuvres with an open bar while enjoying the Meadow Market and arena entertainment. On Saturday morning a VIP brunch will be served while you watch dressage from the VIP Tent, then Saturday evening you can take to the dance floor at the dinner dance party. Your package also includes two seats at the Sunday VIP brunch on cross-country day.  The package carries a value of more than $2,500, and bidding will begin at 6 pm EDT today.  Click here to bid

For more information on Great Meadow International click here

For more information on the Red Fox Inn and Tavern click here

Proceeds from the USEA Online Auction will help support further study into Frangible Fence Research.  The USEA’s Cross-country Safety Sub-committee is in the process of developing, testing and validating a system to test frangible fences to make sure they release under the proper conditions.

The USEA has a lifelong history of working to improve safety in Eventing for our horses and riders as shown by the investment in the studies we have implemented over recent years. The Cross-country Safety Sub-committee has been invaluable in reviewing and advising on all the work done over the past few years. Recently the committee devised a technique that will allow designers and builders to perform a simple test to ensure that when a new frangible fence is constructed on a cross-country course, it releases according to the standards set by the FEI. Once that step is completed, the committee will work with the FEI to sign off on the concept of this system. Funds are urgently needed to purchase the pins, clips, weights and other equipment required for this testing with the end goal being to make the system available to all course builders. Your help in meeting this goal through this online auction are greatly appreciated.

The Broussard Charitable Foundation Approves Increase in the Rebecca Broussard International Developing Grant

Rebecca Broussard. Photo Courtesy of the Broussard Family.

Rebecca Broussard. Photo Courtesy of the Broussard Family.

The USEA Foundation is excited to announce that the Broussard Charitable Foundation has approved an increase in the amount of the Rebecca Broussard International Developing Grant from $30,000 to $50,000. The grant is in memory of one the sport’s greatest benefactors, Rebecca Broussard who passed away in 2010, and is awarded to assist and encourage the development of event riders at the highest level of the sport.  These grants will be awarded to offset some of the travel and training expenses in the pursuit of achieving the qualities of an international rider. This grant is not available to any rider who has already achieved the honor of representing the United States of America on an international team.

The successful recipient will have competed in the CIC3* or CCI3* at the upcoming Event at Rebecca Farm and will have participated in the interview process with the panel responsible for awarding the grant. The Broussard Charitable Foundation also makes Travel Grants available to assist eligible riders in making the journey to The Event at Rebecca Farm. Applications for these grants must be made before June 20. Applications are available here

The USEA Foundation is truly grateful for the generosity shown by the Broussard Charitable Foundation in making these grants available. Rebecca was a much-loved member of the USEA, and in addition to her philanthropy, she served as a board member of the association and as a trustee of the USEA Foundation for many years. The sport is indebted to Rebecca and the USEA Foundation is honored to have the opportunity to keep her memory alive through the administration of these grants.

 

A Leg Up and A Leg On!

Wilton Fair Grant Recipient, Madeline Backus, shares her English Eventing experiences with us.

Fence #4 at Burnham Market - a sizable table followed by two open corners . (Photo - Amy O’Connor)

Fence #4 at Burnham Market - a sizable table followed by two open corners . (Photo - Amy O’Connor)

It’s been just over a month since I arrived in the UK, and this trip has already been so huge for my development as an equestrian and eventer. It is such a great team here at Attington Stud with Austin and Amy O’Connor, as well as the girls with whom I live and work all making me so welcome.

We work from 7 am to 5 pm with a couple of nice breaks for tea. The hard work involved in running a yard is worth it when you are lucky enough to be at a top facility like this and get to work with and ride very well trained and talented horses. It’s amazing how much you can take away from being on high-performance horses and use the experience to create that feeling with the less experienced horses, or even my horses! I feel inspired to improve every day to become a better and stronger rider.

I’ve been able to take lessons with Austin, as well as Gill Watson who visits the yard often. Gill trained the British Junior and Young Rider Three-Day Event teams for 30 years during which time the teams won NINETY SIX medals!  One of the biggest things I have been working on is keeping my leg on. Ari has trained me that when she gets excited, I react by taking my leg off, even when I know that is wrong. So I have been striving to improve that, encouraging her to accept my leg and really work over her back. She is an amazing horse to have dealt with me and all my learning over all the years we have been together. I will be so lucky if I ever have another one like her—she is very special. 

I was so happy with her at Burnham Market, our first competition in the UK. Like in the US, I had to be sure to register myself, and my horse with British Eventing, and purchase a season ticket for Ari to allow her to be entered in competitions. The system is a little different, but with help and some time spent online, I was able to enter the events I needed to. I was very lucky to run the Advanced at Burnham before the organizers had to cancel the rest of the event due to all the rain and mud. Unfortunately, the bad weather has caused the cancellation of many events already this year. I was unsure of how Ari would handle it because she has never run in mud before, but she exceeded my expectations. After having the first rail in show jumping because we were both still getting accustomed to the mud, she adjusted very quickly and casually sprung even higher over all the fences. I didn’t push for time on the cross-country because the going was quite slick and heavy, but she came off the course well and recovered very nicely. It was a great track to run with some good questions. The event is so well run and overall was a cool experience. 

Mud tracks on the final day at Burnham Market  (Photo - Izzy Riley.)

Mud tracks on the final day at Burnham Market  (Photo - Izzy Riley.)

Although there are many similarities to Eventing at the Advanced level in the US, there are also a lot of differences. First of all, it was so neat that everyone arrives in their lorries, and they all stay on site. I normally camp at all the events, but it was so fun to know that there were dozens of other lorries all parked in a field, and everyone was there to stay for the weekend. Everyone was willing to help one another out if generators went off, or you needed an extra phone charger or wanted to meet for dinner. Even though it was cold and rainy, you could feel that everyone was in it together. Also, it was so muddy by the final day that all the lorries had to be pulled out by big tractors—definitely a new experience for me. 

Another thing I learned was that all helmets must be tagged so that the officials know you have an approved and safe helmet. It was simple enough; I just had to take my helmets to the show office when picking up my number, where they quickly check them and put a little colored band around one of the straps. The number I received is just like what we are used to for cross-country--pieces of paper that you slide into the pinney holder, except you wear this during all phases here. I must admit, it felt a little weird placing it over my shadbelly and show jumping jacket. 

Warming up for dressage. (Photo - Madeline Backus)

Warming up for dressage. (Photo - Madeline Backus)

Dressage was in a grass arena, as well as show jumping. I did my dressage on Thursday afternoon, followed by show jumping with cross-country on Friday. Even though the time between the two phases was close, we didn’t ride show jumping in our cross-country gear like you see a lot of riders do in America. Instead, you wear all the traditional show jumping gear and then change to cross-country gear right afterward.

The studs I used at Burnham Market. I had never used the big pointy ones before. (Photo - Madeline Backus)

The studs I used at Burnham Market. I had never used the big pointy ones before. (Photo - Madeline Backus)

However, you don’t change out studs. I had a pair of massive grass studs in my stud kit that I purchased years ago when I visited England on holiday. They have been sitting in my stud kit getting rusty, but finally, they got to do their job. And let me tell you, I was very happy to have them. Studs were another learning experience. I typically don’t like to go too uneven because I am used to more solid ground, especially in Colorado, but Austin assured me that the ground was so soft that any studs she had in would sink into the turf and that I needed to have a bigger pointed stud on the outside for both front and hind. I’ve included a picture of the studs I used, and they were great. 

Ari did end up losing a shoe to the mud, but luckily it didn’t seem to affect her very much as she powered around and hunted the flags. We have been so fortunate to be at Attington with the all-weather footing in the outdoor arena, on the gallop track, and the cross-country, so even with all the mud this year, I could make sure we were prepared.

I also let Ari get a feel of the natural footing when the weather permitted because I think it’s important to practice on the surface you will perform on, and I didn’t want her getting too used to the beautiful and perfect footing all the time. Another way they prepare their horses here is road work. It seemed a bit odd at first to take horses out and walk and trot on the local roads and through little villages, but I quickly got used to it. I don’t get off the property much, so I love hacking through the local villages and down lanes between fields of sheep and cute little houses and cottages. 

Hacking on the country lanes. (Photo - Madeline Backus)

Hacking on the country lanes. (Photo - Madeline Backus)

It really is beautiful here, and sometimes I feel the need to pinch myself to make sure I am not just imagining it all. This is truly a leg up in my career, and I am keeping my leg on and my eyes set on my goals, and have been loving every minute (even in the rain - I really can’t complain). I am looking forward to competing Advanced at Belton Park this weekend, and following that, Ari and I will be taking on our second CCI4* at Badminton! I am forever grateful to the Lenaburgs and the Broussards, without whom this would have never been a possibility and to Team Attington for letting me be here with two horses. And thank you too to all the friends, family, and supporters who have helped get me get settled and ready to take on this opportunity of a lifetime. Stay tuned for more, and please don’t hesitate to reach out to me with any questions. (email: info@useventing.com)

Vinnie and Ari enjoying the green green grass of England. (Photo - Madeline Backus)

Vinnie and Ari enjoying the green green grass of England. (Photo - Madeline Backus)